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Poster: healthsafety Date: Oct 9, 2011 9:05am
Forum: moviesandfilms Subject: Re: Copyright question for someone who knows what they're talking about?

I'd like to know, what the copy right status on "High Noon" (1952) is.

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Poster: MrCranky Date: Oct 9, 2011 1:48pm
Forum: moviesandfilms Subject: Re: Copyright question for someone who knows what they're talking about?

There is a FAQ and many old posts that may help you sort things out. If you wait for advise here first you will never upload anything. A hoard of well meaning people wll give conflicting arguments. Then those posts will degrade into side arguments.
So if you want to upload a film in good faith after researching it yoursef, please upload it now. If it is in copyright, the IA will take it down. But a surprising number of old media turns out to be in the public domain.
Of course this is advise from a well meaning person.

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Poster: healthsafety Date: Oct 9, 2011 3:09pm
Forum: moviesandfilms Subject: Re: Copyright question for someone who knows what they're talking about?

Someone has given me a response on this in a thread above. References have been made to legislation and everything.
His opinion: Still copyrighted.

My opinion. Any copyright expires after 50 years and there is no state that simply can grant "renewals" on it.
1952 + 50 = 2002 meaning it's expired for more then eight years.

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Poster: mondofilm Date: Oct 9, 2011 5:06pm
Forum: moviesandfilms Subject: Re: Copyright question for someone who knows what they're talking about?

When High Noon was first released the copyright law in the USA was 28 years plus a second 28 years if renewed in time- They done change the law to life of the creator plus 50 years or 75 years if a company held the copyright- Then came the Bono Act (As in Sonny Bono who wrote it) and 20 more years was added to copyright for 70 years plus life or 95 years if a company- The old movies that renewed for a second time under the old law were allow a full 95 years from the first time they copyright their films. The intertainment industry have manage to take much of the public domain away from the American public.